Brookline Historical Society
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Brookline Village
Looking south on Harvard St. from Webster Place.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Beacon St. at Summit Ave., 1936
At the entrance to Summit Ave. There are posters in several windows advertising the movies “Desire”, starring Marlene Dietrich and Gary Cooper, and “The Country Doctor. Both are from 1936. Shown from right to left are:
  • #1406-1408, apartments
  • #1410, S. M. Morse, tailor
  • #1410A, vacant
  • #1412, Radio Market Co., Meats
  • #1412A, Greater Boston Cleansers and Dyers, possibly vacant
  • #1412B, Summit Pharmacy (note man holding a tripod and camera(?) in front)
  • #1414, Henry’s Beauty Salon
  • #1414A, Economy Grocery, forerunner to Stop & Shop
  • #1414B, Henry Wong, laundry (note man in the window)

[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Beacon St. at Summit Ave., circa 1932
The store fronts on the right, which are slanted, are on the other side of the entrance to Summit Ave. From left to right are:
  • A reelection poster for Herbert Hoover on the side wall. This poster appears to be an unusual updated version of the earlier well-known “Keep Him on the Job” poster.
  • #1432A, Jacob Bell, tailor
  • #1432, The Vincent Shoppe, a beauty shop
  • #1430A, vacant
  • #1430, A & R Bros., Grocers

[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Emerson House, 74 Davis Ave.
Looking south toward Davis Ave .at the rear of the house. On the left are the stables.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Emerson House, 74 Davis Ave.
Looking south from the rear of the house. Davis Ave. is behind the large tree.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Brookline Village, Looking Southward
Seen from the top of the third Town Hall.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
J. M. Seamans & Co.
256 Washington St., corner of Davis Ave. In 1889, James Manning Seamans replaced his wooden two-story store with this brick building that still stands. His son, Manning Seamans, took over the business from his father. Upon the latter’s death in 1910, the business was closed and replaced by William Dexter Paine, Stationer.

One possible speculative configuration for the three men is, from left to right: unknown employee, Manning Seamans, James Manning Seamans.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
J. M. Seamans & Co.
256 Washington St., corner of Davis Ave. In 1889, James Manning Seamans replaced his wooden two-story store with this brick building that still stands. His son, Manning Seamans, took over the business from his father. Upon the latter’s death in 1910, the business was closed and replaced by William Dexter Paine, Stationer.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Aerial Photo, Circa 1930, Coolidge Corner
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
St. Mary's Church of the Assumption, circa 1873
The Church was built in the early 1850s between Andem Place and Station Street to serve the growing Catholic, mostly Irish, population of Brookline. The first service was held on Christmas day, 1853. The current church on Linden Place was opened in 1886 and this building was later incorporated into the Holtzer Cabot factory on Station St.

The photo is one of a series of stereoviews taken circa 1873-1876 by Richard Hills and son. There is a bit of an optical illusion in the left foreground. Shown is the wooden fence from the property on the other side of Andem Place.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
S. S. Pierce Delivery Wagon.
1592 Beacon St. is in the background. The entrance to Summit Path is visible just behind the wagon.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Devotion School Class Photo, November 1905
Seen in front of the Edward Devotion house. School buildings are off-photo to the left and the right.

This is one of two photos taken on the same day, likely in November 1905, related to the town’s bicentennial celebration. The time of day seems similar on both and the students and teachers appear mainly the same in both photos but posed in markedly different positions . The reason is unknown.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Corey Hill, circa 1888
Looking from Aspinwall Hill at the southwest corner of Corey Hill. Behind the trees on the left is Washington Sq., still undeveloped. In the foreground on the far right, on Washington St., is the gasometer. At the top of the hill is the house of Peder Olsen, at 141 Summit Ave.

The widening of Beacon St. has just been completed. Eben Jordan, of the Jordan Marsh department store owns most of the land pictured and is beginning development. He will soon erect a large mansion here.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Corey Hill, circa 1890
Looking from Aspinwall Hill across the still undeveloped Washington Sq. to the southwest corner of Corey Hill. In the foreground is the large mansion of Eben Jordan, still under construction here (the stone wall along Beacon St. and the stone pillars which bracket the entrance to Summit Path, the latter still standing, have not been added yet). Jordan, one of the principles of the Jordan Marsh department store, was developing much of the land visible here after the recent widening of Beacon St. Just to the right of the Jordan mansion is a horse-drawn cart carrying construction materials. Behind that is #5 Mason Terrace, under construction, and behind that is #12 Mason Terrace, both are still standing.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Morss Ave.
Looking north from Juniper St. at the boarding houses of 10, 12, 18, 20 Morss Ave.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Beacon St. At St. Mary’s St.
North side looking west from St. Mary's St. From left to right:
  • #1002, First National grocery store. It has replaced the brownstone that was part of the existing row.
  • #1004 - 1020, none of the brownstones remain standing save #1018
  • #1022-1024, storefront is still standing
  • #1032, house, no longer standing
  • #1038, partial view of the apartment building, still standing

[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Bike Parade, circa 1900, Brookline Village
Looking at the west side of Washington St. across from Station St. This is most likely a Fourth of July parade. The stores pictured were at this location in 1899 and 1900. From left to right:
  • #188, James Terry, Shoe Repair (partial)
  • #192, Thomas Mahon and Sons, Plumbers
  • #194, Flately and Sweeney, Custom Tailors
  • #198, John T. Cahill, Provisions
  • #200, James B. Hand, House Painter and Decorator
  • #208 Washington St., the Chace building, still standing (partial)

[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Beacon St. at St. Paul St.
South side of Beacon St. viewed from left to right:
  • #1223, Hampton Court (partial)
  • St. Paul St.
  • #1243, house no longer standing
  • #1247-1249
  • #1253 (partial)

William Sundell, Painting & Glazing, 84 Harvard St., 1908
The bakery of Annie L. Driscoll & Winifred N. Hayes, cousins who also lived together at 175 Washington St., is partially viewed to the left. The buildings are no longer standing.
Boylston St., January 22, 1913
Looking east from the south side of Boylston St. one block east of Cypress St. On the left is the apartment building at 300 Boylston St. On the right is the house of Annie C. Crocker at 136 Cypress St.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
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