Brookline Historical Society
Recent Additions

146 Naples Rd.
140 Naples Rd. is to the left.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
75-77 Monmouth St., circa 1910
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Monmouth Court, West Side
Looking south at numbers 19 - 27.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Babcock St.
Looking north. 210 Babcock St. is on the left followed by Winslow Rd. 209 Babcock St. is on the right.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Babcock St.
Looking north from Abbottsford Rd. Photo by town engineer, Henry A. Varney, whose car is in the photo, foreground right. Varney routinely parked his car within the range of his photos, often with a door open.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Bethany Sunday School
Washington St. at the junction with Cypress St., School St. to the right. This image shows the third iteration of the once tall steeple.

Known as the “Bethany Building”, the church was constructed in 1844 as the first church in Brookline of the newly-organized Harvard Congregational Society. The building was sold in 1873 as the Society prepared to move to a larger structure at the corner of Harvard St. and Marion St. After a brief stint as a Methodist church followed by several additional changes of ownership, the building was acquired in 1887 by the Bethany Sunday School Association which held it for the next twenty years. The building was torn down in 1928.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Boston & Albany Railroad, Brookline Village
Looking west. On the left is the rear of the brick building at 81 Boylston St., still standing. In the middle is the pedestrian overpass at Davis Path, no longer standing. In the foreground left is a partial view of the rear of 38 White Place, followed by 40 White Place, both still standing.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Fischer Hill, Aerial View
[Source: National Archives]
Brookline Village, Aerial View
[Source: National Archives]
Boylston Street Between Cypress & Cameron Sts., 1956
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Reservoir Lane, 1898
[Reservoir Lane View 14] Looking north. The house of Ebenezer Reed is on the far right in the distance. Other houses in the area of the northeast corner of today’s Reservoir Road and Boylston St. can be viewed to its left.

Reservoir Lane is one of the earliest roads in Brookline and was originally a section in the trail used by Native Americans to travel from Roxbury to Nonantum Hill in Newton. In 1905, the lane became today’s Reservoir Road, a new section was added on the north end connecting to Middlesex Rd., and only a small length of the lane remains by Middlesex Rd.

In 1892, author Bradford Kingman described the lane as “one of the wildest and most picturesque spots, and the land thereabouts such as anyone who had never explored would hardly suppose could be found within the limits of such a town as Brookline, and so near to Boston. The present lane is narrow, rocky, winding, steep, up hill and down vale, bordered with briars and gay with wild flowers, or attractive with berries in their season.”
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Reservoir Lane, 1898
[Reservoir Lane View 13] Looking north. The house and barn of John Wright are on the right.

Reservoir Lane is one of the earliest roads in Brookline and was originally a section in the trail used by Native Americans to travel from Roxbury to Nonantum Hill in Newton. In 1905, the lane became today’s Reservoir Road, a new section was added on the north end connecting to Middlesex Rd., and only a small length of the lane remains by Middlesex Rd.

In 1892, author Bradford Kingman described the lane as “one of the wildest and most picturesque spots, and the land thereabouts such as anyone who had never explored would hardly suppose could be found within the limits of such a town as Brookline, and so near to Boston. The present lane is narrow, rocky, winding, steep, up hill and down vale, bordered with briars and gay with wild flowers, or attractive with berries in their season.”
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Reservoir Lane, 1898
[Reservoir Lane View 12] Looking north. The house and barn of John Wright are on the right.

Reservoir Lane is one of the earliest roads in Brookline and was originally a section in the trail used by Native Americans to travel from Roxbury to Nonantum Hill in Newton. In 1905, the lane became today’s Reservoir Road, a new section was added on the north end connecting to Middlesex Rd., and only a small length of the lane remains by Middlesex Rd.

In 1892, author Bradford Kingman described the lane as “one of the wildest and most picturesque spots, and the land thereabouts such as anyone who had never explored would hardly suppose could be found within the limits of such a town as Brookline, and so near to Boston. The present lane is narrow, rocky, winding, steep, up hill and down vale, bordered with briars and gay with wild flowers, or attractive with berries in their season.”
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Reservoir Lane, 1898
[Reservoir Lane View 11] Looking north at Patrick Mooney's house (on the left) and the two houses of William D. White.

Reservoir Lane is one of the earliest roads in Brookline and was originally a section in the trail used by Native Americans to travel from Roxbury to Nonantum Hill in Newton. In 1905, the lane became today’s Reservoir Road, a new section was added on the north end connecting to Middlesex Rd., and only a small length of the lane remains by Middlesex Rd.

In 1892, author Bradford Kingman described the lane as “one of the wildest and most picturesque spots, and the land thereabouts such as anyone who had never explored would hardly suppose could be found within the limits of such a town as Brookline, and so near to Boston. The present lane is narrow, rocky, winding, steep, up hill and down vale, bordered with briars and gay with wild flowers, or attractive with berries in their season.”
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Reservoir Lane, 1898
[Reservoir Lane View 10] Looking north at Patrick Mooney's house (on the left) and the two houses of William D. White.

Reservoir Lane is one of the earliest roads in Brookline and was originally a section in the trail used by Native Americans to travel from Roxbury to Nonantum Hill in Newton. In 1905, the lane became today’s Reservoir Road, a new section was added on the north end connecting to Middlesex Rd., and only a small length of the lane remains by Middlesex Rd.

In 1892, author Bradford Kingman described the lane as “one of the wildest and most picturesque spots, and the land thereabouts such as anyone who had never explored would hardly suppose could be found within the limits of such a town as Brookline, and so near to Boston. The present lane is narrow, rocky, winding, steep, up hill and down vale, bordered with briars and gay with wild flowers, or attractive with berries in their season.”
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Reservoir Lane, 1898
[Reservoir Lane View 9] Standing across from William D. White's house looking north at Charles Webber's house. In the distance is the Metropolitan Water Works Pumping Station.

Reservoir Lane is one of the earliest roads in Brookline and was originally a section in the trail used by Native Americans to travel from Roxbury to Nonantum Hill in Newton. In 1905, the lane became today’s Reservoir Road, a new section was added on the north end connecting to Middlesex Rd., and only a small length of the lane remains by Middlesex Rd.

In 1892, author Bradford Kingman described the lane as “one of the wildest and most picturesque spots, and the land thereabouts such as anyone who had never explored would hardly suppose could be found within the limits of such a town as Brookline, and so near to Boston. The present lane is narrow, rocky, winding, steep, up hill and down vale, bordered with briars and gay with wild flowers, or attractive with berries in their season.”
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Reservoir Lane, 1898
[Reservoir Lane View 8] Standing at Patrick Mooney's house looking north at Charles Webber's house.

Reservoir Lane is one of the earliest roads in Brookline and was originally a section in the trail used by Native Americans to travel from Roxbury to Nonantum Hill in Newton. In 1905, the lane became today’s Reservoir Road, a new section was added on the north end connecting to Middlesex Rd., and only a small length of the lane remains by Middlesex Rd.

In 1892, author Bradford Kingman described the lane as “one of the wildest and most picturesque spots, and the land thereabouts such as anyone who had never explored would hardly suppose could be found within the limits of such a town as Brookline, and so near to Boston. The present lane is narrow, rocky, winding, steep, up hill and down vale, bordered with briars and gay with wild flowers, or attractive with berries in their season.”
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Reservoir Lane, 1898
[Reservoir Lane View 7] Looking north. The house and barn of Charles Webber are on the right. On the left is the waste weir, still standing and visible today from Reservoir Rd. In the distance is the Metropolitan Water Works Pumping Station.

Reservoir Lane is one of the earliest roads in Brookline and was originally a section in the trail used by Native Americans to travel from Roxbury to Nonantum Hill in Newton. In 1905, the lane became today’s Reservoir Road, a new section was added on the north end connecting to Middlesex Rd., and only a small length of the lane remains by Middlesex Rd.

In 1892, author Bradford Kingman described the lane as “one of the wildest and most picturesque spots, and the land thereabouts such as anyone who had never explored would hardly suppose could be found within the limits of such a town as Brookline, and so near to Boston. The present lane is narrow, rocky, winding, steep, up hill and down vale, bordered with briars and gay with wild flowers, or attractive with berries in their season.”
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Reservoir Lane, 1898
[Reservoir Lane View 6] Looking north. The house and barn of Charles Webber are on the right. In the distance is the Metropolitan Water Works Pumping Station.

Reservoir Lane is one of the earliest roads in Brookline and was originally a section in the trail used by Native Americans to travel from Roxbury to Nonantum Hill in Newton. In 1905, the lane became today’s Reservoir Road, a new section was added on the north end connecting to Middlesex Rd., and only a small length of the lane remains by Middlesex Rd.

In 1892, author Bradford Kingman described the lane as “one of the wildest and most picturesque spots, and the land thereabouts such as anyone who had never explored would hardly suppose could be found within the limits of such a town as Brookline, and so near to Boston. The present lane is narrow, rocky, winding, steep, up hill and down vale, bordered with briars and gay with wild flowers, or attractive with berries in their season.”
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Reservoir Lane, 1898
[Reservoir Lane View 5] Looking south. The house and barn of Charles Webber are on the left.

Reservoir Lane is one of the earliest roads in Brookline and was originally a section in the trail used by Native Americans to travel from Roxbury to Nonantum Hill in Newton. In 1905, the lane became today’s Reservoir Road, a new section was added on the north end connecting to Middlesex Rd., and only a small length of the lane remains by Middlesex Rd.

In 1892, author Bradford Kingman described the lane as “one of the wildest and most picturesque spots, and the land thereabouts such as anyone who had never explored would hardly suppose could be found within the limits of such a town as Brookline, and so near to Boston. The present lane is narrow, rocky, winding, steep, up hill and down vale, bordered with briars and gay with wild flowers, or attractive with berries in their season.”
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
 1  [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] Next