Brookline Historical Society
Recent Additions

Coolidge Corner, circa 1934
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Harvard St. At Babcock St., 1933
Looking south toward Coolidge Corner.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Beacon St. at Coolidge Corner, 1946
From left to right:
  • 1295 Beacon St., the post office, essentially unchanged today
  • 1297 Beacon St., still standing
  • 1299 Beacon St.

[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
357 Kent St., 1933
The house, no longer standing, was built in 1860 for David Sears III, the son of David Sears who owned much of the Longwood area. It was demolished by 1940 and replaced by today’s Chatham Circle subdivision. Photo by Henry A. Varney, Brookline town engineer.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
30 Warren St.
Looking northwest from Walnut St. The house, located on Walnut St. at the northeast corner with Warren St. at what is now addressed as 30 Warren St., was known by the names of some of its owners over the years, the “Gridley-Hulton” house and the “Gardner-Sumner house.

It was built in 1740 by Nathaniel Gardner, a Boston merchant, it was later purchased as a summer retreat by notorious Tory, Henry Hulton, who entertained British soldiers at the house during the early years of the Revolutionary War. In 1877, it was acquired by Moses Williams who replaced the house circa 1886 with the house that still stands at 30 Warren St. today.

[ref. Brookline by Hardwicke and Reed]
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
30 Warren St.
The house, located on Walnut St. at the northeast corner with Warren St. at what is now addressed as 30 Warren St., was known by the names of some of its owners over the years, the “Gridley-Hulton” house and the “Gardner-Sumner house. It is viewed here from Boylston St. and the steeple of the First Parish on Walnut St. can be seen in the background.

It was built in 1740 by Nathaniel Gardner, a Boston merchant, It was later purchased as a summer retreat by notorious Tory, Henry Hulton, who entertained British soldiers at the house during the early years of the Revolutionary War. In 1877, it was acquired by Moses Williams who replaced the house circa 1886 with the house that still stands at 30 Warren St. today.

[ref. Brookline by Hardwicke and Reed]
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
155 Clyde St.
“Fernwood”, the house built in 1910 for Alfred Douglass, still standing on Fernwood Rd.
[Source: Olmsted]
Combination Wagon #3, 86 Monmouth St., 1902
Listed personnel at this station were L. F. Foster, Lieutenant; Edward McGrath, driver; Hiram C. Hamilton, hoseman.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
"Dutch House", 20 Netherlands Rd.
Still standing, major renovations were completed circa 2020.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
347 Harvard St, Edward Devotion House, Rear
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Boylston-Hyslof-Lee House, 617 Boylston St.
Still standing on Boylston St. near Chestnut Hill Ave. Built by Dr. Zabdiel Boylston, developer of the smallpox vacine.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
39 Buckminster Rd.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Family of George Peabody Gardner, 135 Warren St., circa 1928
This is most likely George Peabody Gardner, Jr.; Rose Phinney Grosvenor Gardner, his wife; and their six children - Catherine P Gardner (15), Isabella S Gardner (13), George P Gardner (11), John L Gardner (5), Rose P Gardner (4), Robert G Gardner (3)
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
83 - 89 and 67-77 Washington St.
On the left is “Chase’s Block” at 83-91 Washington St., constructed in 1912 by Harry E. Chase. On the right is the garage at 67-77 Washington St. Both were demolished circa 2015.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Hawes St., April 1935
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Boylston St. Between Eliot Rd. and Reservoir Rd.
Looking west toward Reservoir Rd. The two houses in the foreground right, #781 and #783 Boylston St. are still standing. In the distance on the left is the brick engine house that was later replaced by the current fire station across the street.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Library, Coolidge Corner Branch 1927 Building, 31 Pleasant St.,
Originally the home of James P. Stearns, a banker, it became the Coolidge Corner branch library after his death
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
83 - 89 Washington St., 1912
On the left is a partial view of 91 Washington St., no longer standing. On the right is a partial view of 67-77 Washington St. whose first floor was a garage. Viewed in the rear center are the sign for Milton F. Reynolds, Carpenter, at 65 Kent St. and Brookline Coal on Pearl St. by the train tracks.

An existing building housing a horse-shoeing business and the adjoining vacant land were purchased by Harry E. Chase who constructed the building shown in the middle of the photo is the building at 83-91 Washington St. It and #66-77 were demolished circa 2015.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Beacon St., Isaac D. White House, 1887
Looking west toward today’s Salisbury Rd. neighborhood from the former 1702 Beacon St. across from Tappan St.

From the 1887 photo series taken just before the widening of Beacon St., most likely by Augustine H. Folsom, a Boston photographer.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
358/360 Washington St., circa 1940
Built circa 1868 as the house of Jonathan Dean Long and the location of his carpentry business. Photo by Marguerite (Long) Goodspeed, Long’s granddaughter, taken shortly before it was demolished.
[Source: Fleming Collection]
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