Brookline Historical Society
South Brookline

254 Clyde St.
Arthur Ouimet, the father of the famous golfer, Francis Ouimet, acquired this house in 1900 along with the house next door at 246 Clyde St. He rented it out while his family lived at #246. The woman and dog pictured match the profile of Mrs. Ouimet, though this cannot be confirmed. Still standing.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
276 - 290 Clyde St., March 1921
Left to right: 276, 286/288, 290 Clyde St., all still standing. #288 was a store and had two gas pumps in front for many years.
[Source: Olmsted]
View of Fisher Hill from Heath Hill
Looking north across the reservoir and Boylston St. from Heath Hill. From right to left:
  • The long white structure of the green house of Joseph White
  • The house on the top of the hill at 73 Seaver St., built in 1892, still standing
  • The large structure barely visible behind the trees is the Longyear estate at 120 Seaver St. Still standing
  • The well-known Boylston - Hyslop - Lee House partially obscured behind the tree; still standing

[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Boylston St. Trolley, 1910
Traveling inbound in the area of Chestnut Hill Ave.
Ebenezer Heath House, 30 Heath St.
Built 1791, still standing.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
Ebenezer Heath House, 30 Heath St.
Built 1791, still standing.
[Source: Brookline Preservation Department]
35 Heath St.
House of Francs Cabot, no longer standing
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
House of George Bacon. Later, Lowell House "Sevenels". 70 Heath St.
From a stereoview circa 1860-1865. Later purchased after the Civil War by Augustus Lowell and named "Sevenels" (Seven Lowells). Extensive exterior renovations in 1947.

Photography studio of Black and Batchelder, 172 Washington St. Boston.
Benjamin White House, 203 Heath St.
Left in photo. Still standing. On Register of Historic Places
Helen Dane Estate, 360 Heath St.
Now part of Pine Manor College
Richard's Tavern, Heath St. near Hammond St.
Northeast corner of Heath and Hammond. Known as the "Old Stage Coach Tavern". Built circa 1760-70. The Worcester Turnpike (Rt. 9) passed behind the house where a tollgate was located.
Hammond St. and Boylston St.
Boylston St. west is to the right. Louis Henry Graves had been working at the Young and Brown drug store in Coolidge Corner and then opened his own drug store at 1186 Boylston St. circa 1907. The business changed hands circa 1924. The apartment building on the left and the rearmost one on the right are still standing.
Boylston St. at Hammond St.
Boylston St. looking west from Hammond St. Louis Henry Graves opened his drug store at 1186 Boylston St. circa 1907 after working at the Young and Brown drug store in Coolidge Corner. He sold the business circa 1924.
Jackson Estate, northwest corner Heath St. and Hammond St. [ref. 1874 atlas]
Built in 1753; no longer standing
Gardner-Quimby House, Heath St
Near Heath St. and Woodland Rd.
House of Thomas Quimby, Heath St.
The house was located on Heath St. on the southwest corner of today’s Woodland Rd. It was built in 1740 by Nathaniel Stedman and later purchased by Benjamin White who owned a lot of land along Heath St. Thomas C. Quimby and family then lived in this house from the 1850s until 1892.

The identity of the two young girls shown cannot be determined. They do not appear to fit the profile of any of Quimby family members. Quimby’s one surviving son also lived in the Heath St. house but only had one daughter. Only one of Quimby’s four daughters was born after 1850 and all remained single, later living together around the corner on Hammond St.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
John G. Wright House, Woodland Rd.
Formerly located on the small hill, corner Woodland Rd. and Heath St. House later owned by Andrew Adie. Now the Soule Playground. The estate's stable is currently the headquarters of the Brookline Recreation Dept.
Woodward-Goldsmith House, Clyde St.
At today's 114 Clyde St. Built in 1723 by John Woodward, occupied for many years by George Goldsmith
Woodward-Goldsmith House, Clyde St., View #2
At today's 114 Clyde St. Built in 1723 by John Woodward, occupied for many years by George Goldsmith
Druce-Craft House, on the Denny Farm, Newton St.
Looking at rear of the house toward Newton St., Lagrange St. is to the left. This house stood roughly where today’s 648 Newton St. is located, a little east of LaGrange St. An approximate timeline is:
  • House built in the late 1600s by Vincent Druce, later assumed by his son. Then passed to the family of Ebenezer Craft and known as “Craft’s place”
  • 1859: Francis Parkman Denny, Sr. moves into the house
  • 1860: Denny marries Emily Parker Groom
  • 1871: Denny moves into a new house up the hill. Charles R. Dow, Denny’s farmer, takes over the Newton St. house
  • 1872: Denny dies. Wife and family remain in the house on the hill
  • Circa 1890: Charles R. Dow changes primary house to Newton St. at Grove St.
  • Circa 1898: the land owned by Denny is purchased by investors and changed to a subdivision of house lots. Wolcott Rd. created and farm house torn down

[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
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