Brookline Historical Society
Recent Additions

Harriet (“Hattie”) Maria Humphrey (18 Oct 1835-16 Jan 1909)
She was the only child of Willard Amherst Humphrey and Harriet Curtis who lived at 209 Newton St., a house that is still standing. She graduated from the Oread Institute in 1854; married James Baker, a Boston ship chandler, in her home in 1859; and raised two children there. Curiously, she raised her sons in the Newton St. house while living with her parents and both sons remained single and lived in the house for their entire lives.
James Elliot Baker (6 Jun 1860-1923)
He grew up in the house at 209 Newton St, still standing, and remained there, never marrying, his entire life. After graduating from Harvard University in 1883, he succeeded his father in the latter’s business in Boston as a ship chandler.
Harry Humphrey Baker (11 Apr 1869-10 Apr 1915)
He grew up in the house at 209 Newton St, still standing. He graduated from Harvard University in 1891, got a degree from Harvard Law School, and joined the law firm of Hayes & Williams in Boston. He later became a judge in the Boston’s juvenile court system. He died of pneumonia one day before his 46th birthday and is buried in the Walnut Street Cemetery. Curiously, both he and his only sibling remained single, living with their widowed mother, and remaining there for the rest of their lives just as their mother had done her parents.
209 Newton St.
Located at the northwest corner with Clyde St., the house is still standing. Known as the Isaac Child House, it is one of the oldest remaining houses in Brookline and of considerable historic interest. The precise age of the house remains unclear. The land upon which it stands was first deeded in 1639, a house was constructed in the present location in the 1740s, and a first floor was added under the original house in 1875. It is not clear from the records whether the current house is based on the original house or if that house was torn down and replaced circa 1800.
209 Newton St.
Located at the northwest corner with Clyde St., the house is still standing. Known as the Isaac Child House, it is one of the oldest remaining houses in Brookline and of considerable historic interest. The precise age of the house remains unclear. The land upon which it stands was first deeded in 1639, a house was constructed in the present location in the 1740s, and a first floor was added under the original house in 1875. It is not clear from the records whether the current house is based on the original house or if that house was torn down and replaced circa 1800.
Property of W. B. Sears, circa 1888
Northwest corner of Washington and Beacon Streets, located approximately at today's 740 Washington St. Torn down in 1897.
Map of Brookline Marshes, 1818
Drawn up by well-known area surveyor, Mather Withington. This plan and others by Withington would be used in court cases involving land ownership disputes.
Beacon St., Circa 1920
Looking west, Winchester St. comes in in the distance, Center is just off screen to the right. The two-story building housing the storefronts in the foreground was constructed 1914-15 replacing the house of D. Blakely Hoar at 1372 Beacon St. All structures still stand today. The stores from right to left:
  • 1372 Beacon: Henry S. Hatch, Undertaker
  • 1374 Beacon: Beacon News Co. Magazines can be seen hanging in the window.
  • 1374a Beacon: Coolidge Corner Shoe Repairing Co. James De Luca, proprietor.
  • 1376 Beacon: Kim Wah Laundry


From postcard
Corner, Sewall Ave. and Charles St.
Looking north, post 1915. From left to right:
  • Rear building of the Second Unitarian Society Parish House, 50 Sewall Ave., still standing
  • Second Unitarian Society Parish House, 11 Charles St., built 1916, still standing
  • (center rear) 3 Charles St., built circa 1916, , no longer standing
  • 64 Sewall Ave., no longer standing
  • [Source: Digital Commonwealth]
299 Harvard St.
Site of the Brookline Library reading room from 1916 - 1927., precursor to the library branch a 31 Pleasant St.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
South Side, Lower Washington St., 1905
The stores are bedecked with banners celebrating the bicentennial These buildings were all demolished in 1907-1908 and the current fire station was opened on this site in 1909.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
P. J. Burns, Horse Shoeing, Brookline Village, 1905
South side of Lower Washington St., #144, corner High St. Hose House 1 is partially visible on the left. Right rear, #4 High St. is partially visible. The fire station is showing banners for the 1905 bicentennial. These buildings were all demolished in 1907-1908 and the current fire station was opened on this site in 1909.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
1566 and 1560 Beacon St.
North side of Beacon St. just west of Mason Terrace. The house on the left was built in 1892 and purchased by King Gillette, inventor of the safety razor, in 1907. It was torn down in 1944. The house on the right was designed by well-known architect Arthur VInal and built in 1889. It was acquired circa 1900 by Fred McQuestern who also owned land situated behind the house that fronted on Mason Terrace. In 1903, he moved the house up the hill to its present location at 41 Mason Terrace and constructed an even larger house at 1560 Beacon St. That was torn down in 1967 and replaced with a large apartment building.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Lower Washington St.
Looking south on Brookline Ave. toward Lower Washington St. To the left is a relatively rare view of Walter Ave., now covered by the Brook House apartment complex. In the middle is the Atlantic Refining Co. at 40 Washington St. To the right is Hinds Hand Laundry, 50 to 60 Washington St. Both businesses first appear in the 1924 town directory and remained for a number of years.
[Source: Historic New England]
Eben Jordan Mansion, 1600 Beacon St.
Beacon St., looking east, is on the right. Eben Jordan, son of one of the two founders of Jordan Marsh, built this mansion in 1890 and lived there until 1897 when he moved into the Beacon Hill house of his parents following their deaths (1895 and 1897). The mansion served as the Choate School (Country Boarding and Day School For Girls) from 1922-1950. The building was torn down in 1955.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Park St., Corner Beacon St.
Looking at the west side of Park St. with Beacon St. just offscreen to the right. From a stereoview labeled as the Mann house with the signature of an Emma L. Johnson (unidentified). Nehemiah Pittman Mann, Jr. lived here, 1381 Beacon St., from approximately 1869 to 1880. The house at 114 Park St., partially visible to the left, is that of Mann’s father, also named Nehemiah Pittman Mann. The father died in January, 1880 after which the son moved to Cambridge. The estimated date of this photo is between 1880 and 1887.
Beacon St. Looking East, Circa 1913
Several blocks west of Washington Sq., looking east. 1714 and 1712 Beacon St., still standing, are on the far left. This is a fairly unique photo showing the simultaneous use of automobiles and horse-drawn carriages. Note that the eastbound vehicles are using the north side of the road while the carriage is on the adjacent bridle path. Brookline passed an ordinance in 1924 dictating unidirectional traffic flow, restricting the eastbound traffic to the south side of the road (obscured on the right side of the photo).
Auburn Court
Auburn St., near Harvard St.
Coolidge Corner, November 28, 1908
Standing on the southwest corner of Beacon St and Harvard St. looking northeast. The brick house on the left is probably that of D. H. Brewer at 16 John St. Obscured by the trolley going north on Harvard St. is the James Whitney house on Pleasant St.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Coolidge Corner, November 11 1908
Standing on Harvard St. at Longwood Ave., looking north to Coolidge Corner. In the distance is 278 Harvard St. on the northeast corner of Beacon St. To the right, on the southeast corner of Beacon St., is Frank A. Russell, Real Estate, at 1321 Beacon St.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
 1  [2] [3] Next
 
© 2016 Brookline Historical Society. All rights reserved.