Brookline Historical Society
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Beacon St., Looking East From Pleasant St., 1893
Pleasant St. coming in at the left. On the right are the Thomas Sears house at 2 Charles St. (still standing) and 1265 Beacon St. is partially visible behind it. At the bottom of the first decline St. Paul St. is visible.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Beacon St., Looking East, Circa 1887
Seen from just west of Winchester St. which is entering Beacon on the near right. Visible on the far right are the front steps of the Samuel Hutchinson house. The house on a slant is on Park St. Preparations for the widening of Beacon St. appear to be in progress.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
312 Kent St.
Home of Benjamin Keith
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
9, 11 Kent St.
Still standing
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
7, 9, 11 Kent St.
All still standing
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
12 Kent St.
Home of Asa and Lydia Fenn. Operated as a boarding house from the time they arrived circa 1887 until 1899. She continued to run the boarding house after his death in 1891. No longer standing.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Harvard Sq., circa 1899
Looking northwest on Washington St,. to the left, immediately past the intersection of Washington and Harvard. The building on the right is the post office, at 283 Washington St. Identifiable businesses in the store on the left are the Postal Telegraph And Cable Co. and Frank A. Carnes, Real Estate at 289 Washington St.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Washington St., Brookline Village
West side of Washington St., just north of Harvard Square, opposite Holden St. Munroe Goodspeed’s livery stable, a building that still stands, is on the right at 316 Washington. To the left is 314 Washington St., housing the carpentry business of William Goodwin which was there from roughly 1870 – 1899.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Goodspeed Livery Stable, 316 Washington St.
Just north of Harvard Square, opposite Holden St. Goodspeed’s stable remained a business here until the early 1930s, later run by Munroe Goodspeed’s son, Carl, and then other owners. The stable provided multiple services for both businesses and individuals. The S.S. Pierce Company boarded its horses and delivery wagons there, horse-drawn taxis could be called, horses were available for rent.

It is evident that Goodspeed’s rented space in this building. For example, from 1895 to 1901 this building was also the address of Dr. James Marshall, veterinary surgeon newly graduated from school. There is a sign visible in the photo for J. C. Barthelmes, Undertaker. John C. Barthelmes had been running a hairdressing business in Brookline for decades and, circa 1895, apparently expanded into undertaking. However, there is no record of his business at this address and the purpose of the sign remains unclear.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
George H. Stone Hook and Ladder Company, circa 1875
Built in 1873, across from the public library, this building is still in use as a municipal building, housing the town’s police and fire headquarters.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Goodspeed Livery Stable, 316 Washington St.
Just north of Harvard Square, opposite Holden St. Originally run in a wooden structure in partnership with Grafton Stone, Goodspeed’s stable remained a business here until the early 1930s, later run by Goodspeed’s son, Carl and other owners. The stable provided multiple services for both businesses and individuals. The S.S. Pierce Company boarded its horses and delivery wagons there, horse-drawn taxis could be called, horses were available for rent.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Stone and Goodspeed Livery Stable, 316 Washington St., 1874
Just north of Harvard Square, opposite Holden St. Run by Munroe Goodspeed and Grafton Stone. The stable, later replaced by a brick structure that still stands, remained a business here until the early 1930s.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
269 Kent St.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
View From the Old Town Hall, Looking Northeast, circa 1900
Foreground, left to right, all on Prospect St:
:::The southeast corner of the police station and courthouse
:::The old 1844 town hall, now the police station
:::The southwest corner of the old Pierce Grammar School, built in 1855, sections of which remain as part of the current Pierce Historical Building
Center, left to right:
::: Washington St. looking north
::: South side of the library
::: The construction of the 1901 replacement Pierce Grammar School being built facing School St. on the site of the old 1856 high school
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
56 Walnut Place, Circa 1873
The three Stevenson sisters - Martha Curtis (1830), Francis Greely (1833), Anna Brace (1835) –apparently never married and lived together their entire lives, largely in Brookline. Circa 1869, after the death of their widowed mother in 1866, they moved from a house on Cypress St. to this house. In 1896, they moved to the house immediately behind theirs at 94 Upland Rd, which they had purchased in 1893. Also living with the sisters in this house, until her death in 1874, with Mary Elizabeth Curtis, their mother’s sister. It is likely that she is the one pictured in the upstairs window while two of the sisters are standing in the yard.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Boylston St.,Near Cypress St., January 22, 1913
Looking west from the south side of Boylston St. one block east of Cypress St. The tall brick building on the far left was constructed circa 1906 and housed the Elizabeth B. Hall Stables at 316 Boylston St. The section to the right was added a few years later, both just behind the existing house in front. The house on the far right was on the southeast corner of Cypress and Boylston. The two houses in the foreground are no longer standing, the brick stable was still in use in 2019 as a car barn at an auto dealership.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Green St., Coolidge Corner, February 5, 1927
Looking down Green St. from Harvard St. Gurley’s Bakery on the corner. Possibly shown: newsboys with their wagon on a Saturday.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Harvard St., Coolidge Corner, February 5, 1927
From left to right:
::284 Harvard St. – S. Buxbaum & Co. Provisions
::286 Harvard St. – Beacon Universalist Church
::288 Harvard St. – M. Malmrose, Printing and Coolidge Corner Moving
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
S. S. Pierce Building, February 5, 1927
Looking at the S. S. Pierce building from Green St. Visible at 276 Harvard St. is Frey's Hairdressing Parlors, run by Louisa Frey and later by her son, Douglas C. Frey. The shop had recently moved from across the street and remained there into the 1940s.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Lower Washington St., North Side, circa 1910
From right to left:
:: First building: #97/99 Washington at the intersection with Pearl St.
:: Second building: #101/103 Washington
:: Third building (narrow brick): #105 Washington; living quarters with a small storefront
:: Fourth building (draped in bunting):
#107 rear (probably an outhouse down the alley): home of James H. Maher
#109: The logo used by the Lyceum Café (1905-1910) is visible on the windows
#111 (single door, in the middle): James H. Maher, Carriage Maker
#113: Lyceum Hall Pharmacy
:: Fifth building (billboard on top) #115 Washington
Hosts the billboard for “Boyle & O’Neil Honeybrook Whiskey, Roxbury Crossing” that was also present in a 1914 photo
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
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