Brookline Historical Society
Recent Additions

First Electric Trolley Car
This car was the first to run on Henry Whitney's groundbreaking streetcar line which started service in 1889 along with the widening of Beacon Street.
Three-car Train on Today's “C”
Seen here traveling east in Coolidge Corner, these cars were manufactured as part of a group of center-entrance cars, numbered from 6100 to 6299, that were in 1919/20. They were reduced in service by the late 1930s but briefly returned to service during periods of increased demand during World War Two.
322 Walnut St.
This house was built in 1715 by Samuel Clark (the 2nd) and was eventually occupied by six generations of the Clark family until its demolition in 1902. Samuel Clark from the fifth generation eventually took over the house. When, in 1862, he built a house for himself next door, at 310 Walnut St., his daughter, Helen, and her husband, William S. Cutler assumed ownership of the house. When they moved to a new house steps away on Chestnut St., they rented out the Clark house.

The house was rented by Alma Charity Mears Macallister, “Mrs. Richard Macallister”, the woman posed in front of the house. She had been living in India where her husband ran cotton/jute/hemp mill operations employing more than 1,400 workers and where he was also vice-consul general for the United States. When he died in April, 1882, at the age of 52, Alma returned to the United States with her son, Richard, who had spent his entire 13 years in India. After living in Brookline Village for a few months they moved to the Clark house in 1883. In 1898, the two moved around the corner to 31 Clark Road and the Clark house remained empty until it was demolished in 1902.
310 Walnut St.
In 1715, the house next door at 322 Walnut St was built by Samuel Clark (the 2nd) and was eventually occupied by 6 generations of the Clark family until its demolition in 1902. In 1862, Samuel Clark from the 5th generation at 322 constructed this house at 310 Walnut St. Samuel’s daughter, Helen Clark, took over the house at 322 Walnut with her husband, William S. Cutler. Both houses are no longer standing.
310 Walnut St.
In 1715, the house next door at 322 Walnut St was built by Samuel Clark (the 2nd) and was eventually occupied by 6 generations of the Clark family until its demolition in 1902. In 1862, Samuel Clark from the 5th generation at 322 constructed this house at 310 Walnut St. Samuel’s daughter, Helen Clark, took over the house at 322 Walnut with her husband, William S. Cutler. Both houses are no longer standing.
99 Warren St.
This is a rare photo of the house prior to its transformation by Frederick Law Olmsted who purchased it in May, 1883. The house was built in 1810 by Joshua Child Clark and sold to Olmsted by Clark’s two living daughters, Sarah and Susannah Clark. The sisters were persuaded to sell the house, which was not for sale at the time, provided that Olmsted build them a cottage behind the house where they would continue to live.
Charles H. Stearns House, 265 Harvard St.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Charles H. Stearns House, 265 Harvard St.
Viewed from Longwood Ave. The driveway entrance is located to the left rear at the apex of Harvard St. and Longwood Ave. The S.S. Pierce tower in Coolidge Corner can be viewed in the distance.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Charles H. Stearns House, 265 Harvard St.
The back of the house is viewed on Beacon St.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Charles H. Stearns House, Rear, circa 1887
Looking west on Beacon St. at the rear of the house which sits at a right angle to its entrance around the corner on Pleasant St. The house would soon be moved 400 feet to the southwest for the widening of Beacon St.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Charles H. Stearns House, circa 1887
Beacon St. looking east on the left, The old extension, since removed, of Pleasant St. to the right.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Washington Square, 1914
Edward Augustus Wild
A physician who started in the practice of his physician father, Charles Wild; Brigadier-General in the Civil War who lost his left arm in the battle of South Mountain and who later commanded an African-American regiment; a swashbuckling figure in foreign escapades.
Harriet (“Hattie”) Maria Humphrey (18 Oct 1835-16 Jan 1909)
She was the only child of Willard Amherst Humphrey and Harriet Curtis who lived at 209 Newton St., a house that is still standing. She graduated from the Oread Institute in 1854; married James Baker, a Boston ship chandler, in her home in 1859; and raised two children there. She raised her sons in the Newton St. house while living with her parents and both sons, who remained single, also lived in the same house their entire lives.
Harry Humphrey Baker (11 Apr 1869-10 Apr 1915)
He grew up in the house at 209 Newton St, still standing. He graduated from Harvard University in 1891, got a degree from Harvard Law School, and joined the law firm of Hayes & Williams in Boston. He later became a judge in Boston’s juvenile court system. He died of pneumonia one day before his 46th birthday and is buried in the Walnut Street Cemetery. Both he and his only sibling remained single, living with their widowed mother, and remaining in the Newton Street house for the rest of their lives, just as their mother had done with her parents.
209 Newton St.
Located at the northwest corner with Clyde St., the house is still standing. Known as the Isaac Child House, it is one of the oldest remaining houses in Brookline and of considerable historic interest. The precise age of the house remains unclear. The land upon which it stands was first deeded in 1639, a house was constructed in the present location in the 1740s, and a first floor was added under the original house in 1875. It is not clear from the records whether the current house is based on the original house or if that house was torn down and replaced circa 1800.
209 Newton St.
Located at the northwest corner with Clyde St., the house is still standing. Known as the Isaac Child House, it is one of the oldest remaining houses in Brookline and of considerable historic interest. The precise age of the house remains unclear. The land upon which it stands was first deeded in 1639, a house was constructed in the present location in the 1740s, and a first floor was added under the original house in 1875. It is not clear from the records whether the current house is based on the original house or if that house was torn down and replaced circa 1800.
Property of W. B. Sears, circa 1888
Northwest corner of Washington and Beacon Streets, located approximately at today's 740 Washington St. Torn down in 1897.
Map of Brookline Marshes, 1818
Drawn up by well-known area surveyor, Mather Withington. This plan and others by Withington would be used in court cases involving land ownership disputes.
Beacon St., Circa 1920
Looking west, Winchester St. comes in in the distance, Center is just off screen to the right. The two-story building housing the storefronts in the foreground was constructed 1914-15 replacing the house of D. Blakely Hoar at 1372 Beacon St. All structures still stand today. The stores from right to left:
  • 1372 Beacon: Henry S. Hatch, Undertaker
  • 1374 Beacon: Beacon News Co. Magazines can be seen hanging in the window.
  • 1374a Beacon: Coolidge Corner Shoe Repairing Co. James De Luca, proprietor.
  • 1376 Beacon: Kim Wah Laundry


From postcard
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