Brookline Historical Society
Ethel Stanwood Bolton 1886 Gem Tintype Photo Album

Grace H. Dana, 1886
1863 - 1929; parents: Henry Fuller Dana and Mary Heath Howe; never married; lived on Warren St. by Clyde St.

Her father died when she was nine years old and is buried in the Walnut St. Cemetery. The family lived with her maternal grandmother on a large estate on Warren St. by Clyde St. Her younger sister, Katherine, and her older sister, Mary, are also featured in our tintype collection.
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Roger Edmund Tileston, 1886
1869 - 1922; married, 1897, Maria Regina Gordon; parents: John Boies Tileston and Mary Wilder Foote; May 1885 to January 1889 lived on Harvey St., corner of Walnut. 1898: lived at 173 Walnut; 1900-1903: lived at 33 Edge Hill Rd.

He was a principle in Tileston and Hollingsworth, a paper manufacturer located in Hyde Park, and continued in that industry among several other firms. He graduated from Harvard in 1891 by which time the family had moved to Milton, which also would have been reasonably close to the main paper mill on the Neponset River. His father died in 1898 and his mother moved to 71 Marlborough St. in the Back Bay. The settlement of Roger’s 1915 divorce went to the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. By 1916, Mary Wilder Foote Tileston had moved back to Brookline at 43 Appleton St. Roger’s sister, Amelia, also appears in this album. The exact location of the family’s 1885 house is currently unresolved. The city directories list the address as Upland Ave. (then Harvey St.), corner of Walnut St. yet the 1888 Atlas shows no structures at that location. It is our speculation that they lived in one the houses on Walnut owned by Edward Philbrick. John Boies Tileston was in the Harvard class of 1855 with Edward's younger brother, William Dean Philbrick and Roger later lived at 173 Walnut, a Philbrick house.
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Amelia Peabody Tileston, 1886
1872 - 1920; never married; parents: John Boies Tileston and Mary Wilder Foote; May 1885 to January 1889 lived on Harvey St., corner of Walnut.

Born in Dorchester, she later moved to Brookline and attended "Miss Baker’s" school. She studied nursing and worked in her life, apparently tirelessly, to aid people who were suffering. She traveled the world to this end and, in 1916, she returned from Europe to her mother’s house at 45 Allerton St., consumed by wanting to aid the beleaguered Serbian refugees from WWI. She went to Serbia and worked for the Red Cross but died there, of pneumonia. Her work is detailed in the book " Amelia Peabody Tileston and her canteens for the Serbs". Her older brother, Roger, also appears in this album.
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Gertrude Steese, 1886
1875 - 1963; parents: Edward Steese and Ellen Bradley Sturtevant; married, 1896, Norman Hill White; lived at 105 Gardner Rd.; buried Mt. Auburn Cemetery.

Her father was a physician turned wool merchant. Her husband, Norman H. White, owned a bookbinding firm and a publishing company and served as state representative from Brookline for five years. He was an ally of Louis Brandeis, later the first Jewish justice of the United Supreme Court, in several policy battles and was a vigorous defender of Brandeis when the latter faced opposition to his appointment to the high court. Oddly, just four years after Brandeis’ accession to the court, White’s company published the first American edition of the anti-Semitic forgery The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. It is unclear what role White had in its publication; he worked in military intelligence during the First World War and may have been exposed to anti-Bolshivek, anti-Jewish propaganda. He later ran into financial difficulties and served two-and-a-half years in prison for larceny for securing bank loans based on false statements. He died in 1951.
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Ethel Bradford Drew, 1886
1873 - 1942; parents: Charles Drew, Mary Bradford; lived at Gorham Ave.; married, 1902, Dr. Charles Borden;
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Mary Appleton Ware, 1886
1877 - 1968; parents: Charles Pickard Ware and Elizabeth Lawrence Appleton; married: Malcolm Cunningham Ware (same last name); lived at 195 Walnut St.

Mary’s family lived at 195 Walnut St. in the 1880s, one of a string of houses built and owned by Edward Philbrick. Her brother, Henry, also appears in this album. Her father, Charles Ware was a music transcriber and educator and an abolitionist who worked with freedmen in Port Royal, part of the areas of South Carolina controlled by the Union Army. He later contributed to the publication of Slave Songs of the United States.
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Henry Ware, 1886
1871 - 1956; parents: Charles Pickard Ware and Elizabeth Lawrence Appleton; married: 1898, Louisa Fuller Wilson; lived at 195 Walnut St.

Henry’s family lived at 195 Walnut St. in the 1880s, one of a string of houses built and owned by Edward Philbrick. Henry graduated from Harvard College in 1893; graduated from Harvard Law School, married, 1898, Louisa Fuller Wilson; and joined the law firm of Storey and Thorndike. His sister, Mary, is also featured in this album. His father, Charles Ware was a music transcriber and educator and an abolitionist who worked with freedmen in Port Royal, part of the areas of South Carolina controlled by the Union Army. He later contributed to the publication of Slave Songs of the United States.
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Cora Codman, 1886
1874 - ; parents: James Macmaster Codman and Henrietta Gray Sargent; married, 1894, William Ely; lived on Warren;
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Lindsley Loring, 1886
1871 - 1956; Harvard College, 1893; parents: Thacher Loring and Margaret Fuller Channing; lived at 92 High St.; married 1895, Charlotte Blake Cochrane;

is the sibling of Alice and Majorie who are also featured in this album; direct descendant of William Ellery, a signer of the Declaration of Independence; his great-grandfather was the fourth dean of Harvard Medical School.
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Alice Loring, 1886
1874 – 1934; married, 1897, William Lothrop Edwards; parents: Thatcher Loring and Margaret Fuller Channing; liveat 92 High St.

Alice is the sibling of Lindsley and Majorie who are also featured in this album; a direct descendant of William Ellery, a signer of the Declaration of Independence; and her great-grandfather was the fourth dean of Harvard Medical School. She lived with her physician husband in various locations in Boston’s Back Bay. By 1923 they were living at 15 Hereford where they lived until January 1934, the month in which they both died.
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Marjorie Channing Loring, 1886
1877 - 1959; never married; parents: Thacher Loring and Margaret Fuller Channing; lived at 92 High St

is the sibling of Lindsley and Alice who are also featured in this album; direct descendant of William Ellery, a signer of the Declaration of Independence; her great-grandfather was the fourth dean of Harvard Medical School.
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Elizabeth ("Elise") Dexter Bennett, 1886
1874 - 1914; parents: Stephen Dexter Bennett and Helen Frances Howe; lived at 305 Walnut St, near Cypress;
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Eliza ('Elsie') Barrett Mills, 1886
1873 - 1963; parents: Arthur Mills and Jennie May Barrett; married, 1901, Philip Yardley De Normandie ; lived at 22 Irving St. near Walnut;
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Katherine Storey, 1886
1879 - 1920; married, 1904, Malcolm Donald; parents: Moorfield Storey and Anna Gertrude Cutts; lived at 44 Edge Hill Road, in a house that still stands.

The family house at 44 Edgehill Road was designed by Robert Peabody, a well-known architect who had been her father’s college roommate and lived next door. Moorfield Storey was a president of the American Bar Association and the president for most of its existence of the Anti-Imperialist League, an organization founded to oppose the annexation of the Philippines as a colony and to support free trade and the gold standard. Its members included Jane Addams, Andrew Carnegie, Grover Cleveland, Mark Twain, Samuel Gompers, and John Dewey, among many notables. Later, Storey became the first president of the NAACP, a role he served in from 1910 until his death in 1929. Katherine’s husband graduated from Harvard Law School in 1902 and practiced in Boston, they lived in Milton with their two children.
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Edward Stanwood, 1886
1876- 1939; married Marion Evans; parents: Edward Stanwood and Eliza Maxwell Topliff; lived at 76 High St.

Younger brother of Ethel and cousin of Maud who also appear in this album. He graduated from Bowdoin College, the alma mater of his father, and Harvard Law School. Worked in Boston.
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Ethel Stanwood, 1886
Ethel Stanwood (1873 - 1954); married, 1897, Charles Knowles Bolton; parents: Edward Stanwood and Eliza Maxwell Topliff; lived on High St.

Ethel Stanwood created the two albums of 1886 tintypes in which are presented this photo of her as well as those of her, brother, Edward, and cousin, Maud and many of the young people who lived in her Pill Hill neighborhood in 1886. She graduated from Wellesley College in 1894. She was a Registrar for the Massachusetts Society of the Colonial Dames, authored books and articles about local history, and was an amateur artist. Her husband is the author of Brookline, The History of a Favored Town and other books, was Librarian of the Brookline Public Library from 1893-1898, and spent the remainder of his career as Librarian of the Boston Athenaeum.

The family house remains one of the most unusual buildings in Brookline. Built for Edward Stanwood and designed by Clarence Luce, it is a true example of the English Victorian Queen Anne style, which inspired the American version of Queen Anne. Its gargoyles embarrassed Stanwood, publisher of the extremely influential The Youth’s Companion, who became known as the man with "the house of sunflowers and devils."
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Maud Stanwood, 1886
1868 - 1958; never married; parents: Isaac Augustus Stanwood, Isabel Frances Sturgis.

Her father was brother to the father of Ethel Stanwood, who created this album, and her brother, Edward. He was a wealthy manufacturer of paper in Maine.
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Margaret ("May") Winsor, 1886
1877 - 1960 ; parents: Alfred Winsor and Linda Kennard; married, 1903, Charles Collins (1873-1956) (at some point the family name was changed to Collens); lived on Walnut St. between Cypress and Walnut Place.

Her father, a Civil War veteran, was the president of the Boston Towboat Company and the Boston & Philadelphia Steamship Company. Her maternal grandfather, Martin P. Kennard, was a jeweler, customs house collector, and sub treasurer of the United States in Boston. His home at 25 Kennard Street is now the Brookline Music School. Margaret’s husband was a prominent architect with the firms Allen & Collens and Allen, Pelton & Collens. Among their designs were the Cloisters and the Riverside Church in New York, the Lindsey Chapel of Emmanuel Church in the Back Bay, and the Newton Town Hall and War Memorial.
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Alice Dalton, 1886
1873 - 1909; parents: Henry Rogers Dalton and Florence Dwight Chapman;

Henry Dalton was a wealthy insurance broker and had been a captain in the Civil War. After the war he returned to Boston and married Elizabeth Lowell Dutton Russell in 1865. They had two children before she died in 1869, the second was Elizabeth who is also featured in this album. In 1872 he married Florence Chapman and moved to 288 Marlborough, Boston. Alice was their first child together. In 1908 he purchased 181 Beacon St., Boston, steps from his brother’s house at 189. Alice died in New Mexico in 1909 of typhoid fever while visiting her sister Susan whose husband was a justice of the New Mexico Supreme Court and a former United States Assistant Attorney General.
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Sebastian Bennet Curry, 1886
1874 - 1951; married Maria (last name unknown); parents: Cadwallader Curry and Mary Abby Lane; lived at 100 High St. at Cumberland.

His father was in the wool business and served as a banking commissioner in Massachusetts. His mother was a music teacher. The family moved to Europe in 1890 and Sebastian lived at various times in Switzerland, Italy, and Austria, but primarily in the town of Riederau-on-the-Ammersee, Germany, near Munich, where he was a farmer. Here is how he described his path to Riederau (in an affidavit accompanying his 1915 U.S. passport application): "Went to Europe in order to take up the study of chemistry & languages, but, on account of hard work my health broke down and, on the physicians’ advice, I went into farming in order to have my health restored. Subsequently my mother bought a farm which I have been running ever since 1906. My health has greatly improved but not yet sufficiently to permit a change of climate and surroundings. " His father died in 1918 and his mother in 1932, both in Munich. Sebastian died in 1951 in Kufstein, Austria where he is buried. He was still an American citizen. His occupation was listed on the death certificate as "farmer".
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